Know Your Rights Before You’re Left Out

When publishing was only a matter of paper and ink, and reading material was produced by hand, author’s “rights” were pretty simple. There were none. Whatever the author wrote, the author sold and the author kept the money. With the invention of the printing press, came a new industry, Publishing. The good news for authors was that their works could be reproduced in large quantities. The bad news was that authors and writers now needed protection from these same publishers in order to receive fair compensation for each reproduction of their work sold. In order to insure the author would receive this compensation, more than a handshake was needed. Thus began the first written agreement between the publisher and the author; the contract, and a new terminology was created around the phrase author’s “rights”.

The first contracts were a simple agreement between the publisher and author. Publisher agrees to pay author a percentage of each book sold. For awhile things were going along quite well and everybody was happy. Then, one day, the owner of a local theater read a novel and decided it would make an interesting play. A new contract had to be drawn up between the author of the original work, the publisher of that work and the theater owner (renamed “Producer”) who wanted to use the work of the talented author for their own profit, Thus the term “Dramatic” rights was added to the vocabulary and things started to get a little complicated. Authors and writers needed help in the ever growing “rights” industry and a new profession was born: the Literary Agent. (Not to be, but often is, confused with another profession held in equally high esteem, the Lawyer.)

In the early days of horse and buggy when books were delivered only to a small area, local rights were all one needed. But with the onset of trains, planes and automobiles, “international”rights became part of the contracts. Along with the birth of the motion picture industry, came the added line “film rights” which begat television rights, which begat video tape and audio books rights as well.

The relationship between all parties was going along quite well for most of the 20th century. Authors were writing, agents were rejecting author’s writing, author’s kept writing, agents sent manuscripts to publishers, publishers rejected manuscripts, agents got lucky, agents got 10%, publishers got rich, agents got richer, authors got burned out. Then, during the latter part of the 1990’s, the entire industry took a dramatic turn with the creation of a brand new publishing medium: The Internet, and it begat a brand new term never before heard of in the history of the published world: “Electronic” rights.

As recently as 1995, the Writers Market didn’t even show a listing for ebook rights. For the writing novice, all they listed was the usual explanation of First Serial Rights – or North American Rights, Second serial (reprint) Rights, Subsidiary Rights, and Dramatic, Television, and Motion Picture Rights, which are usually purchased on a one-year option, generally for 10% of the total price by an interested party, usually a producer, who then tries to sell the idea to other people. (Remember our friendly little “theater owner”?)

Electronic rights can cover a lot of territory. Take this article for example. It’s being read on your computer screen, but you can also download it to your hard drive, make a print copy, or several print copies, and send it out across the world in an instant. And the author, me, wouldn’t receive one dime for any of it. However, before you hit that button, check the top of this page, and you’ll see a little © symbol. Hey, it’s “copyrighted”! Which means if I catch you making money off my work, I’ll see you in court. It also means that anything I write cannot be reproduced in any form without my express, written permission. (So, just go ahead and ask first!) But the ebook rights go much further than simply the reproduction of articles. It includes full length books, and is now a very important part of any legitimate book contract. It’s also something that every author and writer should be totally knowledgeable about before signing any contract. If you have an agent, there is a good possibility they aren’t up on all the legalities of this new industry. But, I’m assuming that since you’re reading this on an electronic device, most of you are more knowledgeable than most on the wonders of ebook and epublishing.

The writing and publishing profession is changing almost daily. Print-On-Demand companies are giving traditional publishing houses a run for their money. Ebook publishers, such as Smashwords.com and many others are making huge strides in the electronic market which is growing at a furious pace. Literary agents and traditional publishers who aren’t totally aware of this new industry or thought that this is only a “temporary phase” are finding themselves out of a job.

You only need to follow the recent law suit brought by the Author Guild against GOOGLE to see where the future is going, and it’s not a good one for writers.

Authors who are not fully knowledgeable of their rights in this new electronic age, are going to find themselves losing vast sums of money to them that do. The bottom line is, KNOW YOUR RIGHTS before you sign on that same bottom line. Your reputation as well as your bank account demands no less.

Know Your Rights Before You’re Left Out!

copyrightWhen publishing was only a matter of paper and ink, and reading material was produced by hand, author’s “rights” were pretty simple. There were none. Whatever the author wrote, the author sold and the author kept the money. With the invention of the printing press, came a new industry, Publishing. The good news for authors was that their works could be reproduced in large quantities. The bad news was that authors and writers now needed protection from these same publishers in order to receive fair compensation for each reproduction of their work sold. In order to insure the author would receive this compensation, more than a handshake was needed. Thus began the first written agreement between the publisher and the author; the contract, and a new terminology was created around the phrase author’s “rights”.

The first contracts were a simple agreement between the publisher and author. Publisher agrees to pay author a percentage of each book sold. For awhile things were going along quite well and everybody was happy. Then, one day, the owner of a local theater read a novel and decided it would make an interesting play. A new contract had to be drawn up between the author of the original work, the publisher of that work and the theater owner (renamed “Producer”) who wanted to use the work of the talented author for their own profit, Thus the term “Dramatic” rights was added to the vocabulary and things started to get a little complicated. Authors and writers needed help in the ever growing “rights” industry and a new profession was born: the Literary Agent. (Not to be, but often is, confused with another profession held in equally high esteem, the Lawyer.)

In the early days of horse and buggy when books were delivered only to a small area, local rights were all one needed. But with the onset of trains, planes and automobiles, “international”rights became part of the contracts. Along with the birth of the motion picture industry, came the added line “film rights” which begat television rights, which begat video tape and audio books rights as well.

The relationship between all parties was going along quite well for most of the 20th century. Authors were writing, agents were rejecting author’s writing, author’s kept writing, agents sent manuscripts to publishers, publishers rejected manuscripts, agents got lucky, agents got 10%, publishers got rich, agents got richer, authors got burned out. Then, during the latter part of the 1990’s, the entire industry took a dramatic turn with the creation of a brand new publishing medium: The Internet, and it begat a brand new term never before heard of in the history of the published world: “Electronic” rights.

As recently as 1995, the Writers Market didn’t even show a listing for ebook rights. For the writing novice, all they listed was the usual explanation of First Serial Rights – or North American Rights, Second serial (reprint) Rights, Subsidiary Rights, and Dramatic, Television, and Motion Picture Rights, which are usually purchased on a one-year option, generally for 10% of the total price by an interested party, usually a producer, who then tries to sell the idea to other people. (Remember our friendly little “theater owner”?)

Electronic rights can cover a lot of territory. Take this article for example. It’s being read on your computer screen, but you can also download it to your hard drive, make a print copy, or several print copies, and send it out across the world in an instant. And the author, me, wouldn’t receive one dime for any of it. However, before you hit that button, check the top of this page, and you’ll see a little © symbol. Hey, it’s “copyrighted”! Which means if I catch you making money off my work, I’ll see you in court. It also means that anything I write cannot be reproduced in any form without my express, written permission. (So, just go ahead and ask first!) But the ebook rights go much further than simply the reproduction of articles. It includes full length books, and is now a very important part of any legitimate book contract. It’s also something that every author and writer should be totally knowledgeable about before signing any contract. If you have an agent, there is a good possibility they aren’t up on all the legalities of this new industry. But, I’m assuming that since you’re reading this on an electronic device, most of you are more knowledgeable than most on the wonders of ebook and epublishing.

The writing and publishing profession is changing almost daily. Print-On-Demand companies are giving traditional publishing houses a run for their money. Ebook publishers, such as Smashwords.com and many others are making huge strides in the electronic market which is growing at a furious pace. Literary agents and traditional publishers who aren’t totally aware of this new industry or thought that this is only a “temporary phase” are finding themselves out of a job.

You only need to follow the recent law suit brought by the Author Guild against GOOGLE to see where the future is going, and it’s not a good one for writers.

Authors  who are not fully knowledgeable of their rights in this new electronic age, are going to find themselves losing vast sums of money to them that do. The bottom line is, KNOW YOUR RIGHTS before you sign on that same bottom line. Your reputation as well as your bank account demands no less.

Chronicles of an Indie Book Publicist: 5 Things Self-Published Authors Need to Stop Immediately

Chronicles of an Indie Book Publicist: 5 Things Self-Published Authors Need to Stop Immediately.

History of a Published Novel

It started with a title, which became an idea, which became a story, which became a manuscript, then became a book.

Red Wine for Breakfast is the most published novel you’ve never heard of. The novel has had three agents, been optioned for a movie, has five publishers and was one of the very first print-on-demand titles to hit book store shelves.

Before M.J. Rose reached fame for her e-book on a disk, Red Wine For Breakfast was published by Book-On-Disc.Com (June 24, 1999). Before Dan Poynter made his fortune as the marketing guru in the Print-On-Demand industry, Red Wine for Breakfast was one of the first books published in that format by iUniverse (July 2, 1999).

To say the novel has been there, did that, is an understatement and the fact that with all it had going for it, sold a mere 5,000 copies is a mystery ever author has been trying to solve since the first time a pen and ink was put on paper.

But this isn’t a tale of what might have been, only what was and sharing it with all who have interest may entertain, or delight, or bore you to tears, but for better or worse, here it is;

The title was derived from a conversation I had in a bar with a good friend who mentioned that he enjoyed a glass of Beaujolais in the morning. I joked why would anyone have red wine for breakfast” and later that night wrote it in my diary that it sounded like a great title for a book.

That was 1972.

Two marriages, three daughters and 25 years later Red Wine for Breakfast did indeed become a novel. In 1996, for those of you who remember that long ago, the internet was in its infancy. Cell phones were a luxury and ebook readers were a device used by the crew of the Starship Enterprise. None of which I owned at the time. What I did own was a computer, HP laser jet printer and a WordPerfect program that would format a document in a book format.

What I also owned was a stationery store which was conveniently located next to a full service print store. The first printing of Red Wine for Breakfast was spiral bound with a red card-stock cover that cost me $10.00 per copy to print that I sold at my store for $14.95. Customers would buy the book, I’d sell out the five or so I printed, then walk over to the print store and print another five and sell them one at a time. You could say I was the original “Print-On-Demand” publisher long before the term, or the industry was every heard of.

I did sign with an agent in Los Angeles who sent the manuscript off to several mainstream publishers, most of which are no longer in business. With each rejection, I found something positive to spin, but when Doubleday rejected the manuscript after 9 months, my agent gave up and we parted ways.

Then came the movie producers. I won’t bore you with the details, you can read the nasty tale “A Hollywood Horror Story” on my website.

A few months later, AOL was forming a new club for aspiring writers who wanted to have their books published at very little cost. I was looking for a printer who would charge me less that $10.00 per book and also provide something called an ISBN number so my books could be sold in stores other than mine.

AOL Writer’s Club became the first publisher of Red Wine for Breakfast. As a published author, I began going to writer’s meeting and events. I met another author who had published her books in a CD format for people who wanted to read her books on their computer. I met her published, he liked my book, so Book-On-Disc.com became the third publisher of Red Wine for Breakfast.

Shortly after the novel was on Amazon in CD format, I received an offer I couldn’t refuse from a new publisher who was in the process of buying out the Writer’s Club and wanted all the titles and a new contract with all their authors. The company was iUniverse. The forth publisher of Red Wine for Breakfast.

Because they were buying out our contracts, there was no charge for any of the authors to had iUniverse publish our books. It didn’t take very long for that promise to go the way of the “Be a published author for only $99” deal. The Print-On-Demand revolution was fading quickly, “The Revolution Continues”. At that time another author who had also signed with the Writers Club decided to open his own publishing business and wanted me to join him as his premier author.

Lighthouse Press became publisher #5 in 2001. Red Wine for breakfast also received a new cover and a new author, Raven West. The book did farely well for a number of years, then another new publisher who was branching out Internationally contacted me with what was a too good to be true deal and Lighthouse and I parted ways in 2009. Chalet publishers were now #6 for about five weeks. Not unlike iUniverse way back the day, most of what they promised never materialized. I wasn’t that surprised to discover they went out of business in 2012.

Red Wine For Breakfast is now in the digital world of ebooks with Smashwords, publisher #7. I still own all the rights and occasionally when I have a few hours, will pick it up and re-read the story. As soon as I can reformat the cover, I’ll put it out again with Createspace, who will be publisher #8.

I always said that overnight success takes about 20 years. I have at least another 5 to go!

Is Originality Dead in Prime Time Television?

Either I’m watching way too much television, or there really is a severe lack of creativity and originality in the writing world.

In one week, there were not one, not two, but three prime time series which had the identical plot. Castle on ABC, Hawaii 5-0 on CBS and Psyche on USA Network all involved an antagonist taking hostages in order to prove their innocence of a murder.

The subsequent stories which followed the opening copy-cat scenarios did involve a somewhat interesting variety that revealed who was the actual killer was, their motive and the effect this all had on the major characters, but the basic premise was exactly the same. Three of them in one week!

I suppose with so many crime dramas currently being aired on so many channels, there are just not enough original stories left to write about. Of course the audience that watches Psych might not be the same as those who watch Castle, or Hawaii 5-0 so maybe the need for creativity or originality isn’t as important as it once was. I sure hope not.

 

You Are What You Drive – DRIVE Fast and Furious the sales of your book the only way YOU can!

A rather well known author once wrote; “What’s in a name?” If you paid $26,000 for a Chrysler mini-van, would it feel the same as driving a FireBird convertible? And what would have happened if Marion Morrison hadn’t changed his name to John Wayne?

For those of you who have been reading my column since I began writing for the Amazing Authors Showcase, you’ve noticed my name changed from “Robin Westmiller” to Raven West. (For those of you who haven’t noticed, you can skip ahead a few paragraphs.) I wanted to offer an explanation as to the circumstances which led me to create a new pen name and the subsequent results that decision has had on my professional and personal life.

Last May, I was visiting a friend of mine in Connecticut. We’ve known each other since Kindergarten and were reminiscing about an old 60’s television show, The Man From U.N.C.L.E.. I came up with an idea for my next novel about two lifelong friends who accidently become involved with an espionage plot during their 30th high school reunion, which happens to be next year. The two of us went though our old yearbook and began sketching out characters we knew who would play different roles, with different names, in the story. Her character’s name was going to be Kathleen, mine was going to be Raven.

The moment I wrote it out on the notebook, I felt a surge of energy. Instantly, I knew Raven wasn’t going to be the name of my fictional character, it was going to be my new pen name. I shortened my last name and Raven West was born. When I returned home, I immediately called my publisher and told him to re-do the covers of both First Class Male and the re-issue of Red Wine For Breakfast. I ditched my bangs, cut my hair, had a new photo taken wearing a black leather jacket, re-did my web page and re-printed all my promotional material.

Within two weeks of the transformation, I was invited to three book events, two radio interviews, three on-line interviews, a live chat, and the Barnes and Nobel World’s Largest Writers Workshop. I was also hired to teach a course at a local university, and two of my entries won first and second place at the Ventura County Fair.

But something else began to change along with the species of bird. The “Robin” persona of a small bird with a dull-red breast of “Rockin’ Robin” fame took on an entirely new attitude under the wings of the Raven, described as “A large bird with lustrous black feathers and a straight, sharp beak.” (thank you Webster’s) which I was more than adept at using, especially to sell my books.

And nowhere was that more evident then at the last book festival I attended. Any author who has ever attended these massive book fairs knows how much of their time is spent “schmoozing” with a number of looki-loos who are more interested in telling you their own story then buying yours. “Robin” spent about an hour listening and sharing and not selling a single book. Then, “Raven” took over, with her straight, sharp beak and one simple sentence coming from that beak. “Buy my book!”

Raven West did not rent a booth to stand in the hot sun for seven hours to chat. Raven West was not there to give advice, listen to other author’s woes or commensurate with unsuccessful writers. Raven West was there to sell books, and sell I did.

One man asked me what the story was about. I showed him the back cover, told him to read it and if he held it for more than ten seconds, he had to buy it. He wrote me a check. One woman started to chat about her writer’s organization, then said she never read fiction. I told her that was too bad and walked away. Another would-be author wanted information on marketing and promotion. I handed him a copy of my printed columns and told him the information would cost him $5.00. He handed me the cash. I sold ten copies of First Class Male, six of the old version of Red Wine For Breakfast and five marketing packets for a one day total of over $200.00.

When I took a break, I walked around to a number of other author’s displays, and not a single person asked me, or even suggested I buy their book. Everyone was so nice, almost apologetic. I, on the other hand practically threatened people. “Buy my book or get out of the way. Don’t waste my time talking about your book, or another author’s book. I’m not interested and I don’t care. I’m not asking you to buy them, I’m telling you to buy them because they’re THAT GOOD.”

And if they don’t like you, so what? At least they’ll remember you and they’ll tell other people what a B—- you are and the next time they’re in a book store, guess whose name they’ll remember? The first rule of publicity is that there is no such thing as “bad” ink!

Many authors I know are almost shy about their work, but if you don’t believe you’ve written a best seller, why would anyone else? If you, the author, don’t “crow” hard and long and proud, you’ll never be heard over the noise of all the other author traffic on the highway. It’s not bragging, as my children constantly accuse me of. It’s promotion, marketing and getting noticed. It’s about selling your books!

How many of you who are reading this right now, truly believe it you’re a “Best Selling Author”? How many of you feel pride in what you’ve accomplished and not some kind of shame or guilt that you feel that way? Shout your accomplishments and do it proudly, because you deserve to be noticed in your own right. When someone tries to compare me to another author, I tell them right to their face that I’m not the next somebody else, I’m the first Raven West, and let others follow me. Then, they buy my book, because if I believe I’m a successful, best-selling author, so will they. And success is contagious.

Writing is about talent, creativity, hard work and a good story. Marketing, promotion and successful selling is about attitude, self-confidence and putting your foot down hard on the gas. It’s about getting out of the traffic jam of authors who have been driving on the same road the same way with stacks of unsold books in their trunk, gathering dust.

If you’re afraid of making a bad first impression, you won’t make any impression at all and then you’ll be just another small bird with a little chirp, instead of what a fellow author recently wrote to me when I told him I was changing my name: “Raven… a darkly beautiful shadow that flies through the hearts and souls of human drama. In the soft light of dusk ..she carries off a story, a tale, to bedazzle the readers of her books…”

Robin drives a mini-van. Raven West drives a red Firebird convertible and I’m passing everyone on the road to riches!

One more thing: Buy my books!

When the Universe Calls, You’d Better Pick Up the Phone

There are definitely times in a writer’s life when life itself interferes with the writing process. My first novel “Red Wine for Breakfast” was published in 1999, the second “First Class Male” in 2001, (Lighthouse Press) then nothing for the next ten years when I decided to go with Createspace for “Undercover Reunion”.  

Oh sure, I have tons of outlines, characters, plots and just as many excuses for not finishing the two 50,000 word novels that have been sitting in my lap top for more years than I want to think about. All those wonderful characters remain hidden in the dark, cold cyberspace screaming for me to free them into the real fictional world!   

Make enough noise, and the Universe will eventually hear you and relay your message loud and clear. And when the Universe yells at you, you’d better listen.

So, here it is, 2014. New Years Eve to be exact and my husband and I were going to a party at a hotel miles from where we used to live. A couple got into the elevator with us, the woman commented on how great I looked (true), then the guy looks at me and says “Hi, Robin”. I had no idea who he was, since I’ve been going by the name Raven West for a few decades, it wasn’t until he said his name was Gordon that I knew exactly who he was. The faux movie producer who had optioned “Red Wine For Breakfast” many years ago.   ( read Hollywood Horror Story which actually won Second Place in Literary Non-Fiction at the Ventura County Fair in 2001).

I don’t know what surprised me more; that someone I’d not seen for more than 20 years would suddenly appear in an obscure hotel in Ventura, or that he would have recognized me (25 pounds lighter and looking really HOT), or that he’d let his hair grow down to his shoulders with a beard to match and looked like an aging hippie who I would not have recognized in a million years.

The “blast from the past” encounter was brief, but strange nonetheless.  I mentioned I had a new book out with a back story to the old 60’s television show, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., he said good luck with that and we parted ways. What I hadn’t realized at the time, that encounter was just the first call the Universe was sending.  There were many more to follow, louder and more persistent than I could have dreamed.

A few days later, I decided to check out a few of my social media sites and happened to read a message on my Linkedin account from Jacqueline Van de Poll, who was very excited to hear about my book “Undercover Reunion” and had purchased a few as gifts for their upcoming Arundel Affair 2014 – Celebrating 50 Years of U.N.C.L.E. convention… in ENGLAND and asked me to send a few signed stickers she could be in the book! I immediately checked Amazon.com.uk and saw my rating had soared to 123,000, which was about a million higher than the book rating in the U.S.  

I then did a search on all things U.N.C.L.E. and much to my elation, discovered that Warner Bros. had just finished filming the movie version of The Man From U.N.C.L.E. starring Henry Cavill (Man of Steel), set for release this year

A second ring from the Universe? Perhaps, but I still didn’t answer.

That gave me the idea to also search for the literary agent, Terrie Wolf who I had once contracted with on First Class Male and was thrilled to see that her agency was still going strong, but wasn’t taking on any new submissions. I called her anyway. Although we hadn’t been in contact since 2009 (for reasons that had nothing to do with our professional relationship), we connected as if no time had passed. We were on the phone for over an hour, catching up on all things publishing, a few personal (we had both become grandparents since last we talked) and, although she couldn’t promise anything, asked me to send her the manuscript, some bio information, media appearances, stats on sales and social media sites and she’d take a look.  

I began to compile the information by first doing a search for Author Raven West and was amazed at how many sites I was on. I’d totally forgotten about all the blog interviews, radio sites, author pages and book signings I’d been part of and, although not astronomical by any means, I did have an impressive amount of blog followers, tweeters, website visitors and Facebook “likes”.  

That damn persistent ringing from the Universe again? Maybe it was time to answer.

Then, last night I experienced the very best thing that any author could and I knew that I could no longer ignore the call. My husband received an invitation to an associate’s 60th birthday party in Redondo Beach, about a 2 hour drive. I didn’t know the man very well, but it was a party and a good excuse as any to get out of the house on a Saturday night. Once we arrived, there was only other guest I knew and she was taking to some people when I stopped by to say hi. The last time I’d seen her, she had come to our Halloween party where she bought a copy of First Class Male.

She immediately started raving about my book to anyone who would listen, which led to everyone within earshot asking me about where they could buy the books which led me to the trunk of my car where I always keep copies of all my books which led me to sell a total of FIVE! The most books I’ve sold in under an hour at full price in years, including a recent book fair.

Of course I signed each one to the delight of the guests! Suddenly all those feelings and memories of how much I loved being an author came flooding back! Talking to fans about the characters and the stories and hearing how much they loved my work and how excited they were to have me sign their copies (take THAT ebooks) reminded me why I was a writer in the first place.

It really isn’t about the money. It really isn’t about Amazon ratings. It really isn’t about vampires, zombies or teenage angst books-to-movie strategies. It’s about the creative process and the joy of putting words on a page that no one else can. It’s about the absolute joy when someone reads your work and wants to talk about the imaginary characters YOU created as if they were real people and shares their enthusiasm with others who also want to know who these people are and their story.

The Universe called and I finally answered. The message was loud and clear; “You are a writer. It’s not what you do, it’s who you are and you will never be happy doing anything else.”

Getting so caught up in the nuts and bolts of the publishing business, marketing and promotion and sales and spending countless wasted hours tweeting and #whatever and @whatever else, I’d forgotten what the Universe was screaming to remind me. I am a writer. It’s not a job, it’s a joy. It’s not a means to an end; it really is who I am. I just spent the last 2 hours writing this blog and I’ve never been happier.

And if all of my 149 followers to this blog buy a copy of “Undercover Reunion”, I’d even be happier!

           

 

           

           

           

           

“The Man from U.N.C.L.E.” Movie will premier in 2014! Undercover Reunion is available NOW!

uncle-book

What could be better than a MOVIE premier that ties directly to your novel? “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.” starring Henry Cavill is set to be released in 2014! What a PERFECT time to have a published novel that ties in to all things U.N.C.L.E.!

Undercover Reunion is a novel for everyone who ever dreamt about being an undercover spy, thwarting an evil criminal genius and winning the heart of a handsome U.N.C.L.E. agent in the process!

“Trapped in a concrete room beneath the headquarters of an international crime organization, four middle-aged high school classmates find themselves caught in a web of espionage and intrigue that threatens their lives and those of everyone they know.

When the undercover agents first approached Melanie Tyler and Kathleen O’Brian the night of their 30th high school reunion, the women could never have imagined that the innocent 60’s television spy show game they had played nearly four decades ago, would become a real life confrontation with one of the most insidious criminal minds of their generation.”

Undercover Reunion is available in paperback and Kindle on Amazon.com and climbed from  6 Million to 95,000 rating on  Amazon.co.uk. The UK are HUGE fans! U.S.A.!, U.S.A.!

What a FANTASTIC early birthday present.. a 5* REVIEW posted on Amazon!!!

Nothing is so great as someone taking the time to tell the WORLD how much they enjoyed your novel!!! OK, millions BUYING my  novel would be REALLY great, and reviews like this one are a good start!

5.0 out of 5 stars AN EXCELLENT READ!, December 4, 2013
By MADDY

I thoroughly enjoyed ’undercover reunion’. I finished the book in one weekend, it was that enjoyable a read. While I knew there would not be a ’Solo’ or ’Kuryakin’ or ‘Waverly’ sighting, I found the characters – especially Mel and Katie – very likeable. I usually am able to guess ’whodunit’ such as in another favorite of mine ’Murder, She Wrote’, the ending did surprise me!

Savvy Authors Newest Contributor!

I’m very proud to announce that I have been invited to be a contributing writer on Savvy Authors, a new author site dedicated to “providing (sic) the best tools, classes, and networking opportunities for authors in all stages of their writing careers, from aspiring novelists to multi-published authors.”

I  invite you all to read my first published article; The Loneliness Of The Long Distance Writer , and feel free to distribute this announcement to all your writers social media, “like” the column, post comments and, of course, buy my recently published novel, Undercover Reunion!